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Slut Drop: The party promoting marginalised creatives in Leeds.

Photographer Chlöe French talks to Slut Drop co-founder and director Cat about how the platform are repping the underepresented by throwing safe and inclusive parties.



Image: Chloe French, NikNak playing a Slut Drop party

Dropping dirty beats across the city, Slut Drop has become a staple in the Leeds party scene. It finds its home in CHUNK, where hip-hop, electronic and experimental beats are played by home-grown female, non-binary, BAME and LGBTQ+ artists. Fresh out of its 6th birthday, Slut Drop’s parties are as influential and as fun as ever; as Slut Drop co-founder, director and resident DJ Cat puts it, Slut Drop is “Made with love for music and art with equality at the core, striving to create environments that feel safe for people to learn and party in.”


‘I feel the love, energy and freedom in that room and it fills me with such immense joy; the DJ is nailing it, everyone is smiling and dancing.”

Slut Drop builds its parties to be accessible from the ground up and does so with a fierceness like no other. From cheap tinnies to headliners that hail from the underrepresented in the DIY club scene, Slut Drop focuses on championing POC, femme/queer/non-binary artists. The crew create a safe space that their audience feels comfortable in, featuring headliners that represent and inspire the diverse audience. Their parties feel like you’re part of a group of mates, except most of these people you’ve never met before, and some of them just happen to be really sick DJs. Before and after their sets, the DJs on the lineup join the party, furthering this free-flowing, friendly party atmosphere. At their most recent party at CHUNK, good vibes and heavy bass-lines reverberate through the space’s intimate white walls; it really felt like you were part of something special. Cat describes the feeling of looking around the room towards the end of the night: ‘I feel the love, energy and freedom in that room and it fills me with such immense joy; the DJ is nailing it, everyone is smiling and dancing.”


“The only way to expect any kind of change in attitudes in the electronic music industry is to showcase artists and make it easier for other promoters to find talent. It gives them no excuse to say they couldn’t find it.”

But Slut Drop isn’t just about lively parties. The brand works towards ending the gender disparity in the dance music scene. In conversation with Cat, she summarised their aim “To pay attention to diversity and equality. If we are trying to prove anything it is that whoever you are, you can do it. Come look at all of us doing it!” The brand has grown with the aim to fund workshops where female, non-binary, BAME and LGBTQ+ folk who are interested in learning how to DJ can do so in a safe and friendly environment. These workshops are an oasis in the desert of the male-dominated electronic music scene and provide those who have been inspired at a party with the skills to start doing it themselves.


Slut Drop is part of a wider transgressive movement of inclusive DIY parties currently taking the UK electronic music scene by storm. Standing shoulder to shoulder with the likes of Equaliser (Leeds), SIREN (London) and Discwoman (New York), Slut Drop aim to fill the gap for femme, BAME and queer artists who play dark, bass-heavy music. In this way, Slut Drop aims to influence who gets put on the bigger lineups around the country. Their wise lineups showcase the best local artists, providing an ‘at a glance’ showcase and making it easier for other promoters to find talent outside of the white heteronormative gaze. As Cat explains: “The only way to expect any kind of change in attitudes in the electronic music industry is to showcase artists and make it easier for other promoters to find talent. It gives them no excuse to say they couldn’t find it.”



Slut Drop is constantly evolving. As DJ, visual technician and organiser Lauren notes, “Each time we learn something new: what we can push next time? What worked, or didn’t work, this time? Each part evolves from the last.’ In such a fluid and dynamic scene, it’s Slut Drop’s willingness to adapt to changing demands which makes it so special. It is clear that, in the six years since their first house party launch, they have concocted a pretty solid recipe for a good party and aren’t afraid to add in new ingredients every now and again.

So, what will the turn of a new decade bring for Slut Drop? Cat sees 2020 bringing more workshops, new event formulas and a few exciting collabs following their amazing night with Equaliser earlier this year. Whatever direction they go in next, it is safe to say that Slut Drop will keep putting on the most inclusive, fiercest and noisiest parties around.


If you’re hungry for more, email: slutdropleeds@gmail.com and ask to be kept up-to-date on all their latest antics.


Words and Images by Chlöe French


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